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Yuteki Tenmoku Masterpiece Sake Set by Shinemon Kiln

$350.00
| /

Yuteki Tenmoku Masterpiece Sake Set by Shinemon Kiln

$350.00
| /

This item ships from Japan

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We sincerely apologize that delivery will take more time than usual. It would be appreciated if you would kindly understand this situation in advance.

description
Made in Arita Japan

Set includes sake carafe and 2 cups with wooden box.
Carafe has a 12.8 oz. capacity

  • Sake carafe measures H: 5.5" Diameter: 3.75"
  • Sake cup measures H: 2.875" Diameter: 2.5"
  • Microwave and Dishwasher Safe
  • Made in Japan

Yuteki Tenmoku

A jet black background with sliver, white or golden brown crystals appearing to float infinitely on the surface is called Yuteki Tenmoku. Yuteki Tenmoku is valued as one of the finest patterns by masters of the tea ceremony, second only to Yohne ware. Yuteki Tenmoku is typically only seen on earthenware based apparatuses, this is because the glaze often causes more delicate materials, like ceramic, to crack or even explode within the kiln. We use porcelain in our design, despite the increase difficulty of use, the end product is less common and more striking.

Yuteki Tenmoku is one of the most recognizable glazes not only due to it's standing within Japanese culture, but due to television dramas that show Tenmoku bowls being served on a tenmoku-dai stand. In southern Song China, 12th and 13th centuries, these bowls were made by dedicated potters for their emperors and the intellectual class. Sharp minds and pure spirits value these specific bowls for their representation of deep space within their design. The endless void of the background embraces and compliments the spirit of the Song of China.

Shinemon Kiln

Shinemon Kiln

In 1972, Shinemon I, born Shinichiro, started the Shinemon Kiln, aspiring to create large-sized ceramics, which was uncommon at the time. At the beginning, he applied sometsuke technique to his large ceramics, 2 to 3 feet in height, drawing patterns in deep-blue underglaze on a white background. His focus, however, gradually shifted to yohen technique, where unexpected colours and patterns emerge in the course of firing, depending on the chemical composition of the glaze. His encounter with cinnabar, in particular, would have a tremendous effect on the future of the Shinemon Kiln. Today, the Shinemon Kiln mainly creates yohen ware, using glazes such as ruby-red cinnabar and crystal glaze, and, with the slogan of “brilliance of form, amazing effect of glaze,” boasts its yusai technique with layers of different glazes fusing together to create beautiful gradation of colours.